• warning: Parameter 1 to theme_field() expected to be a reference, value given in /nfs/c02/h08/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/includes/theme.inc on line 171.
  • recoverable fatal error: Object of class stdClass could not be converted to string in /nfs/c02/h08/mnt/42743/domains/mstrmnd.com/html/sites/all/themes/custom/basic/node-blog.tpl.php on line 109.
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
archive
313112.1706

 

Are you out of your fucking mind?  Like Jack's eye-contacting camera taunt earlier, a little slow tonight, Lloyd? had a second meaning to the audience, a taunt to their lack of comprehension, this one's second meaning is that he's the one out of his mind. Also: this hints at Halloran's next up TV broadcast bearing Danny's out of mind signal.

 

 

In a real time cut, Halloran’s TV turns on, a broadcast that informs us a winter storm has struck Colorado with 10 inches (on channel 10 news). The TV broadcast comes out of a dead signal, a cut to black begins it, as if Halloran or Danny has shined it on, avoiding commercials. The graphics are intricate. A plane, a thunderbird of modern times appears. Continual asymmetries occur in the animating boxes, an off-center logo made of an antenna tower that has a doubling of 10's, typed keys that cut/animate to multiple newsroom monitors, and finally an asymmetrical newscaster all inside a subtly asymmetrical TV that appears symmetric by its centered framing (like Ullman's office) between Halloran's feet. Halloran's wall color matches Ullman's office. Even the Pan Am logo peeks above palm trees, a millisecond gesture with 2001's Orion spaceliner. In a mirror to the Boulder apartment's entertainment area,  the TV's wall has an altar made out of LPs, lamps, the TV and a painting of a nude woman. Even more improbably, both use the same brand of TV. Halloran is not ruled by the Torrance's text, or monochromatic graphics but by bold, colorful images. See above stills, ratios match between TV and wall hanging overlap during the zoom, the move is acutely complex if watched carefully.  A reverse on his bed reveals a similar wall hanging above his bed frame. Halloran worships halo-ed women. They're placed highest in his order. The frame above his bed even shines brightly. Lastly, the painting above his bed disappears in Halloran's final framing. Are these images shined? Does Danny's signal interrupt them? Do Danny and the Hotel shine them? Or is Halloran now on a side of a mirror where these images are not. Kubrick uses these two nudes of differing women as doubles of the nudes Jack and Danny encounter, one is a current occurance (a "now") - Jack's, while Danny's has already occured, which means Danny's memory is played both before and after Jack's encounter. Halloran wears an inverse pattern to the bed in 237's bedroom (below), banded in inner and outer arrows that flow at angles. It's also similar to the blue-hued TV's patterns, only magnified. The Chinle design on 237's bed is an animation/transformation of both TV-pattern and Halloran's pajama weave.

Music cue indicates shining is occuring. Halloran receives Danny's memory (the key shot is a child's eye level) cutting quickly into Jack’s real-time gaze (editing them together) who is entering 237's deeper parts, the room past the mirrored double-doors that were to the left of the exterior doors (the ones labeled 237). A door outside in the corridor is false, it has no corollary in here. Height discrepancy: the suite's steps invalidate the outside door's logic, and suggest the bedroom is an altar.  Layout disrepancy: The orientation from the establish shot, a left of entrance mirrored door, appears to be at our back once we're inside the suite's living room, making the suite's layout impossible. It crosses through the corridor. Danny shines both timeframes into Halloran, either he or 237 is broadcasting this live view of Jack. 237 is a mimic of the hotel setting that ends 2001 (and weirdly there is a logic: if Danny descends from the starchild, the hotel is slyly duplicating the memory of Bowman's that induces alien intelligence to conjure the ending bathroom of 2001). He's equating the visual hallucinatory control of the aliens of 2001 with the spirits that haunt The Overlook. The monolith here, by layout and orientation opposite the bed, are curtains covering a 'window.' Both bed and 'window' are covered by grayscale Navajo Chinle weaving (the Chinle pattern is regional, their locale is geologically unusual and it dominates their storytelling systems: dense angled asymmetries that are triassic in origin). Non-linear lightning. Walking between this: it is a portal, a gateway. Kubrick shows us this unusual room carefully to tell us us: there are no other doors in here, this is a terminus. The bathroom overlaps three patterns here: the floor pattern is the (1) outline of the mirror Jack sleep's across from (2) composed of the road's yellow line finally meeting at an end. (3) The bathroom duplicates the maze's center (see referenced imagery below).  He steps into his bedside mirror as a form in the floor, like the framings of Halloran's feet 'above' his television. Mirrors focus into the center of the room, as if this is a focal point for psychic absorption. Jack pauses at bathroom's edge (in contrast to Danny who next reveals he confronted the hag, avoiding the mirror and its seduction).

Jack pauses at bathroom edge fearfully; Danny's recent experience predicts a violent assault. Danny's recent, offscreen bathroom assault mirrors Jack's against his son in the film's past, referenced during the Doctor's interview in Boulder. Mirrored "lightning" form capped by a shining ball centers the bathroom's ceiling, hinting this room is a portal of transference. Size of ceiling's shining ball references both sun refraction during title sequence and Danny's arriving tennis ball. Lightning/zig-zag patterns seen first as native imagery now becomes modernized, electrified, shined and levitated. A woman peers at Jack and stands, naked, then walks to the center of the bathroom and pauses. Third nude female image, conjured like Halloran's nudes which are self-referential, is a painting come to life. Standing in the center of a focal point of mirrors and right-angle reflected insets, she awaits Jack. Look at the asymmetrical, squared defocused room behind him and the curved, seductive, sharply focused portal he faces, Kubrick's metaphorics extend continuously to photographic qualities.

In the middle of kissing, he pauses to spot himself in a mirror holding not a beautiful woman but the old hag, and in a stroke of storytelling nuance that defines the film, the camera whip-pans: we find ourselves now outside one side of the mirror, his soul separated, half of Jack still stands with the nude beauty inside the mirror, trapped by the hotel - it no longer needs to fool him: because he doesn't know himself. As Jack departs, he no longer recognizes which side of the hotel's mirrors he occupies (he is transforming into a ghost), Danny shows us/Halloran his original view (he is shining them in contrast) and it reveals the ugly woman rising from the tub (from Danny's eye-level). Danny was not lured into the mirror. Distance in ages between inner mirror (the beauty: she exists in the past that the partygoers inhabit) and outer mirror, where we exist, our plane (the hag, she is nearer to the actual age of her decaying body) are differing scales of time/timelessness. Ever and Forever. Who is she? Kubrick adds another mythical Navajo agent, The Changing Woman, "the most revered Navajo deity Estánatlehi. She is so called because, it is supposed, she never remains in one condition, but that she grows to be an old woman, and in the course of time becomes young again, and so passes through an endless course of lives, changing but never dying." [Navaho Legends Matthews 1897] By linking her to Halloran's two nudes, Kubrick carefully reminds us she is no different than the Navajo paintings and rugs that line the Overlook. Abstracted color humanoid forms begin in Ullman's modern Native art as curvolinear, then appear with only straight edges in Colorado Lounge's epic sandpainting. Differences in form that mimic the floor patterns' differences. That she emerges from water links her to our first view of water, the lake's mirror where Jack is headed. The room and its bathroom have an interior color scheme unseen in the film as of yet (and never seen again), and a carpet pattern that finally aims in one direction, towards the commode, a reverse flow up the altar-like stairs, an animation of patterns that began in multiple directions by pointing (the lobby) to cruciform with radiating lines (Gold Ballroom pattern k'an), to bi-directional (the hallway's carpet) to here, unidirectional. From scattered directions to singular. The bathroom includes a color schema from the opening scene: the road's double yellow line that finally meets in the linoleum floor. The road sequence's sun 'flare' is remade as a mirrored form now on the bathroom's ceiling with the green of the forest surrounding the walls, muted. It also has a similar layout as the Boulder apartment's bathroom. Think carefully, if Room 237's carpet pattern's color schema is green and purple (summaries of yellow blue and red blue) that leads/flows into a yellow and green Bathroom, what are its two missing colors? (This is not color theory, this is simply a formula of addition and subtraction.) Answer: red and blue, what Jack is wearing, his outfit completes the formula. Add his skin 'color' and he's the U.S.'s colors: red white and blue. Once he's flipped by the mirror, he walks backwards. Hallway is now darkly lit, unlike previously in Danny's eye-level establish. An unseen, practically supernatural light angles across hallway from behind corner. Its aim creates unnatural shining reflections on 237's door and surrounding hallway. Were we playing with Danny in the other side of the mirror with the ball's taunt-like arrival? Or does the Hotel no longer need to light the carpet, its lure has worked, its shine unnecessary since Jack is now in the final stages of soul-entrapment. Jack passes by a perfectly sharp mirror image in the dark hall's left wall hanging.  Dissolve makes it seem as if Halloran's light is the source of the shine on the 237 door. Ceiling of Halloran den is same angle as Summer of 42's kitchen, a portal with the TV.  An ibex trophy head stares down upon the room. Look at B&W tomb Wendy has that Halloran does not: her bathroom.

Jack backs away from the Hotel’s door apelike.  First of film's backwards walking. Halloran’s call to the Overlook is impossible, all circuits are down.

Jack returns to the apartment and lies about the room’s occupant. We've caught him hiding behind sarcasm now duplicity. Lying enforces an internal mirror. A place where the truth seems possible. Kubrick is employing English for this purposefully, he decays its meaning and usefulness, obviously aware deception is a crucial component to horror.  To further the mirroring nuance: Jack appears for a split-second as the door to the apartment opens in the mirror before being seen as corporeal.  Once you rule out his version there is no other answer. Wendy's single-shot breaks continuity in color temperature. She's in blue hue (like Danny) and the reverse on Jack and wide establish clearly show a yellow hued overhead lamp. Similarly, all exterior light in the Torrance's apartment is conjured, except for the bathroom (see the bathroom's exit above, framed above the Snocat). This means Danny's deep blue hue in this scene, which we assume is moonlight, is a product of The Overlook. Its vertical bands mimic Halloran's news opening. Wendy wants to leave the Overlook, Jack does not and flies into primordial rage. "I could really write my ticket." Danny stares at us in the audience, shining vertically against our horizon, his visions are sideways. He witnesses his own future scrawl and Jack between the blood frothing elevators (similarly framed as its first shot, it deviates orientation, a visual definition of disorientation). His eyes shown carefully missing a lower stretch of white, Danny's eyes are shaping like the elevator's radial floor indicators. He's connecting to the two crucial red elements that end the film as well as the poster. In full disengagement from his family, Jack departs the apartment, not before he glances audienceward, at us, menacingly. He scatters very shiny ringed objects on the floor. The kitchen appears to have many illogical access points illustrated by this entrance into the lobby's perimeter. He stops at the first pattern he originally crossed in the first scene, opposite his frozen ending place, the Navajo double-diamond pattern, a non reflective mirror. To the left of frame is a corridor that shouldn't be there, where Ullman's window should be accessing outdoor light with fauna, proving the window's image is conjured, false.  He hears distant music with physical evidence of a party, dull, unshiny balloons and party favors are scattered, a mimic to his scattering a moment ago. Blue 'moonlight' appears for the first time in these sequences, connecting Danny and Halloran.

 

Entering the ballroom, he appears somewhat unseen by the wealthy partiers while recognized by Lloyd, who pours another stiff round of yellow fluid. Remembering to bring his money this time (the money exists in this mirror), he's promptly told his money's no good here. "Orders from the house" is a poke to the audience that the house is alive, thinking, aware. Lloyd finally names the hotel as a character and offers it consciousness through an idiomatic expression.  Jack joins the soiree and is promptly covered with advocat, a yellow hued cocktail (the reverse of the yellow ball Jack throws).  The hotel employs yellow to withdraw hue, and in reverse of him dipping bacon in yolk, he is dipped. Look at both shots of the ballroom above, they are R-L interviews, Grady wipes Jack from the right side of the mirror. Grady beckons him to the men’s room to cleanse the spill. Jack recognizes him from the hotel’s lore/photographs, he's identified as the caretaker that murdered his family (the girls) described in detail by Ullman.  Grady whose outfit is distinctly black and white world, claims no knowledge of his own history but does know that he has ‘always’ been here. Delbert Grady is virtually a parody of the English origin of the hotel, a character destined for archetype-casting in a Warner Bros cartoon. Performing his duty as a messenger, Grady now has no separate consciousness from the hotel’s. Grady is dead, the Overlook continues his image and voice while Jack is still alive in one of his mirrored halves.  Like Jack’s pending entrance into oblivion, there are two Gradys past and continuum, Delbert (this entity) and Charles Grady (dead and buried).  Jack is to become an infinite blankness in servitude to a nightmare of spiritual control carved into two known identities. The name he is called by, Jack, is about to be shared, which is why the hotel addresses him only by his last name, Mr. Torrance (Jack and Dad are clearer descriptions). The hotel gets the use of his name, like a marriage. This soiree is a ghost-production the hotel conjures as a luring atmosphere, yet it does not have to cater to any class warfare illusion, Mr. Torrance is invisible to the revelers because they are the product of one entity. Notice entrance door logic, Jack seems to know where he's going. The first moments of the bathroom's entrance indicates its layout is illusory, the floors of the ante-room we see beyond the ballroom don't even match with the bathroom's ante-room, its spatial logic extends impossibly into the space of the ballroom. And look carefully, its ceiling has the exact same extensions as the ceiling of the gold ballroom at center point, compare them. This bathroom's layout is a T shape, the stalls extend left and right, a pure right angle made out of banded red.  The color temperature of the overhead and mirror lights are spectral, hue-less, a quality only found in the Ullman office and Room 237's bathroom, other terminal rooms in the hotel with illusional space.

This is one of Jack's death scenes. The spilling and cleaning a ritual to remove Jack's 'color;' yellow bands the previous bathroom. This room is the next color animation as Jack heads towards his black and white graven image. Consider the yellow world, its gauzy luminosity and indirectly diffused lighting they came from seconds earlier and this glaring red and hue-less white room in contrast:  the gold ballroom purified into this color extremity from primitive forms to this modern commode. Remember, The Shining is an animated film in our memories. The red bathroom is also the next animation-state of the blood red that pours from the elevator in the future. Like the hangings and carpet patterns, the bathrooms follow forms. Previous bathroom, 237's, was made of curves, here everything is straight lines. Porcelain tiles are white, ceramic, the red is painted (it was a fluid once) up to a horizontal-line.  A men's room unused by any of the participants in the ballroom (who are clearly drinking). Mirrors frame Grady.  Again faced with a mirror, Jack is not exactly looking at Delbert Grady, he's staring at himself or the Grady in the mirror. Since he may no longer know himself. Trapped but still alive.  Grady in contrast no longer has a live person (his name was Charles) in that mirror standing there with the real Jack, which means if we were to look inside that mirror, there would be no Grady.  Or there is a decrepit ghoul, like the hag. A corpse named Charles, the unseen-offscreen conjuring of Ullman's story, the place where Jack is still trapped running from the hag. Look at Jack looking at the mirror's occupants.  He's appears stunned by what he sees.  Diamond pattern moves from wall of anteroom to floor of bathroom, blood red versions of the Navajo mirroring patterns in the Lobby opening's corridor and floor. The bathroom's a focal point, an ending like The Overlook on its dead-end road. As a film that uses terms carefully, Grady renames his murdering with the propagandic term correction "I corrected them" and equates Jack's murdering to "talking." An indication that dialogue in this film is more than loaded, it's deadly.

continues

 

Login to post comments
Comments